Category Archives: Venice Beach Surf Report

These posts report on surfing in Venice Beach California. Venice Pier, Dogtown.

Woohoo! High Surf Advisory

Photo Courtesy: Steve Christensen Photo

5:11am

Surf’s up!

A high surf advisory is in effect until Saturday morning. A long period west-northwest swell which originated across the central Pacific Ocean is expected to bring high surf to portions of southwestern California.

A beach hazards statement remains in effect through Friday evening. Dangerous rip currents and waves are expected due to elevated surf. Waves 4 to 6-feet with local sets to 8-feet on west  facing beaches are expected.

Remember if caught in a rip current swim parallel to shore until you are free of the powerful current. Caution should be used when in or near the water. Always swim near a lifeguard and and never swim alone.

High Surf is Back Tonight

Photo courtesy of: Steve Christensen Photo

1:07pm

High surf will pound the Los Angeles and Orange
county coastlines for around 30 hours starting tonight, creating perilous conditions for swimmers, National Weather Service forecasters said.

The high surf resulting from a long-period swell will begin striking the Central Coast this afternoon, according to the NWS. By late this evening, surf of between 5 and 7 feet is expected in the Southland, rising to between 7 and 10 feet by Tuesday morning, then persisting through late Tuesday night, forecasters said.

A high surf advisory will be in effect in Los Angeles County from 10
tonight until 3 o’clock Wednesday morning and a less serious beach hazards statement will be in force in Orange County, where forecasters expect surf of 7 to 10 feet with sets of up to 12 feet, from late tonight through Tuesday evening.

“High surf may cause minor beach erosion on exposed west-facing
shores,” an NWS statement said. “The large waves and strong currents will create a risk of ocean drowning. Sneaker waves can suddenly overrun previously dry beaches and jetties. Minor flooding of low-lying beach parking lots, harbor walkways, and campgrounds will be possible.” The NWS urged beachgoers to always swim near lifeguards and, if caught in a rip current, to swim parallel to shore until free of it

Surf Waves SteveChristensenPhoto
A surfer makes the most of big waves last week in Venice. Courtesy of Steve Christensen

In Los Angeles County, the biggest surf is expected on west-facing
beaches, from Palos Verdes to Santa Monica, including Venice beach, and from Point Dume to Zuma Beach, the statement said. The risk of coastal flooding will be highest at high tide, which is forecast to be around six feet at 10 a.m. Tuesday.

In Orange County, the highest surf will be north of Newport Beach,
according to the NWS, which said Seal Beach and Sunset Beach could experience minor coastal flooding. NWS forecasters said the high surf could persist though Wednesday or Thursday because of an expected additional westerly swell.

 

High Surf Advisory

Photo Courtesy of Steve Christensen

7:22am

The National Weather Service has issued a coastal hazard message warning of high surf for southwest California beaches.

The high surf advisory comes into effect today until 10pm Thursday. With very large, damaging surf possible on Wednesday and Thursday.

The extended period of high surf is the result of a series of long period westerly swells, with the first swell brining high surf to beaches today.

The large surf is expected to continue through friday and possibly over the weekend, even though the advisory, at this point, is only in effect until Thursday evening.

The highest surf will occur on west facing beaches from Santa Monica southward to the Palos Verdes, including Venice Beach.

Courtesy of Steve Christensen
Courtesy of Steve Christensen

Waves are expected  up to 9 feet today and by midweek surf will rise to 8 to 10 feet on Wednesday and 10 to 15 feet on Thursday.

The large powerful waves and strong currents will create a risk of ocean drowning, sneaker waves that can suddenly overrun previously dry beaches and jetties, and flooding of low lying beach parking lots, harbor walkways, and campgrounds. This risk will be greater midweek.

In addition, beach erosion and damage to coastal structures, such as the Venice Pier is possible.

The high surf advisory may be music to a surfer’s ears, however the high surf and rip currents will make swimming and rock jetties dangerous.

Remember, if you are caught in a rip current, swim parallel to the shore until you are free of the current, and always swim near a lifeguard

Storms to Bring High Swells

8:12am

The first in a series of storms will douse the Southland today ahead of a much stronger system, which will arrive Tuesday and threaten to unleash torrents of mud and debris over slopes denuded by wildfire, forecasters said.

In all, there will be three or four storms this week, it was not certain this morning exactly how many. They will make themselves felt today, Tuesday, Wednesday and, if a fourth storm materializes, on Friday or Saturday said National Weather Service meteorologist Curt Kaplan.

Kaplan said today’s storm should produce “nothing terrific” but on Tuesday, “we can anticipate debris flows and high surf” since each storm will be forming its own swell.

Between 2 and 3.5 inches of rain are predicted to fall across the coastal and valley areas through Friday, with between 3 and 5 inches falling in the mountains. That much rain in a short period could bring flooding and debris flows, and residents near the sites of previous wildfires were urged to monitor weather reports and consider preparing sand bags. The NWS warned that Tuesday’s storm could trigger flash flooding.

Coastal areas can expect high surf throughout much of next week and possible flooding, especially during the middle of the week when a large swell arrives, according to the NWS. Western-facing beaches will be particularly vulnerable to flooding on Tuesday and Wednesday.

“The overall pattern that is bringing us these storms is finally looking like what we would expect the El Nino pattern to look like that it so far hasn’t this summer,” said John Dumas, science and operations officer for the NWS. The NWS forecast showers today and temperatures in the 60s. Tuesday’s highs under rainy skies are expected to be 4-5 degrees lower than today.

Wet Week Ahead

1:29pm

A series of storm systems lining up across the Pacific Ocean will begin drenching the Southland late tonight or early Monday, bringing rain, snow, high winds and increased flood risk to the area, according to the National Weather Service.

Between 2 and 3.5 inches of rain are predicted to fall across the
coastal and valley areas through Friday, with between 3 and 5 inches falling in the mountains. That much rain in a short period could bring flooding and debris flows from recent burn areas. Residents in these areas are advised to monitor weather reports and consider preparing sand bags.

The first rain is expected to fall after midnight, but the NWS warns
that a bigger storm will land Tuesday morning and continue throughout the day, which is expected to cause the highest risk of flash flooding.

Coastal areas can expect high surf throughout much of next week and possible flooding, especially during the middle of the week when a large swell arrives, according to the NWS. Western-facing beaches will be particularly vulnerable to flooding on Tuesday and Wednesday.

Wednesday is expected to see another storm, with rainfall decreasing somewhat on Thursday, according to the NWS.

About 2 feet of new snow is forecast for the mountain areas above 6,000 feet this week. Snow levels will generally be between 5,000 and 6,000 feet, but could get as low as 3,500 feet Wednesday through Friday. The snow could cause hazardous driving conditions next week in the mountain areas and across the grapevine.

“The overall pattern that is bringing us these storms is finally
looking like what we would expect the El Nino pattern to look like that it so far hasn’t this summer,” said John Dumas, science and operations officer for the NWS.

-from CNS